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Logan Model 200
#1
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Shars had their branded AccuRemote aluminum scales on sale, $75 for a 6" and 24" shipped.  I had to open the read heads and add 0.1uF across the supply rails to make them stable.

I used the L-shaped brackets that came with the scales to mount the 24" Z-axis scale using sections of 1/8" thick 1" aluminum angle from Lowe's.  Short slots in the angle gave me up-down adjustment, and the factory brackets gave me in-out.  Those screws are threaded directly into the aluminum angle.  The scale was mounted with the back facing out.  The chip guard is 1/16" thick 1-1/2" aluminum angle, again from Lowe's.  I had to trim off enough of one side to clear the bracket.  The full 1-1/2" side is flushed up against the back of the bed, and leaves clearance for the bracket mounting screws on the back of the read head.  I used 7mm x 10mm drag chain to manage the cables, which are a friction fit to feed them through.  I bought a 1-meter length from Amazon, and wound up removing only two links.

A chunk of the 1/8" thick angle was used as a spacer to provide enough clearance for the drag chain.  If you don't mind dangling cables you can omit all these fiddly bits.

The TouchDRO app is installed on a 7" Amazon Fire tablet.  You have to go through some gyrations to get the Google Play store installed so that you can install TouchDRO.  I will leave you to google how that is done.

The X-axis scale is mounted directly above the crossfeed screw by drilling and tapping for a couple of 2-56 screws directly into the end of the scale for a small flat plate that attaches to the carriage.  If they were stainless I would sweat bullets trying to do that, because I've had to have broken taps burned out of stainless in the past.

The tachometer function is provided by a cheap IR "Obstacle Avoidance Sensor Module" you can buy from eBay or Amazon for a couple of bucks.  I simply spaced 1/4" wide snippets of reflective tape that came with my laser tach equally around the spindle (after cleaning it thoroughly), mounted the module to clear the gear cover using a 3mm screw and nylon spacer, tweaked the sensitivity and adjusted until I got clean signal, and cinched it down.

   
   
   
   
   
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#2
I have included a picture of the mod to add a 0.1uf ceramic capacitor across the supply rails of the read heads of the scales.

   

This was necessary because starting and stopping the lathe would sometimes make the output jump, and turning on a gooseneck LED lamp that I have on the lathe would make it go completely crazy.

The electronics fit in a Bud box from Digi-Key, stock number 377-1937-ND.  It is just the right size, and has mounting flanges that allowed mounting it very neatly below the headstock.  As you can just make out in the upper left, the bracket for the drag chain is attached to the box.  The Bluetooth module is on an extension cable, which allowed changing the orientation and fitting it in up against the side of the box.  The micro-B USB adapter boards came from SparkFun.  I simply cut notches for the cables along the edge of the box so that the lid clamps them all in place when it's installed.  I actually had cable glands to use, then decided that simple notches would work perfectly well, especially since they are all facing down.  The excess cable was wound up, cable-tied, and the whole mess simply stuffed in the box and the lid screwed on. 

   

 Made me wish I had three hands, but I got it all arranged:

   
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#3
(03-07-2017, 07:35 AM)Briney Eye Wrote: I have included a picture of the mod to add a 0.1uf ceramic capacitor across the supply rails of the read heads of the scales.

This was necessary because starting and stopping the lathe would sometimes make the output jump, and turning on a gooseneck LED lamp that I have on the lathe would make it go completely crazy.

The electronics fit in a Bud box from Digi-Key, stock number 377-1937-ND.  It is just the right size, and has mounting flanges that allowed mounting it very neatly below the headstock.  As you can just make out in the upper left, the bracket for the drag chain is attached to the box.  The Bluetooth module is on an extension cable, which allowed changing the orientation and fitting it in up against the side of the box.  The micro-B USB adapter boards came from SparkFun.  I simply cut notches for the cables along the edge of the box so that the lid clamps them all in place when it's installed.  I actually had cable glands to use, then decided that simple notches would work perfectly well, especially since they are all facing down.  The excess cable was wound up, cable-tied, and the whole mess simply stuffed in the box and the lid screwed on. 

 Made me wish I had three hands, but I got it all arranged:


Very fine looking. I like the way you nested the scale in the cross slide.
What motor setup do you have on the lathe? Looks interesting. My 210 is needing motor attention.
_Dan
-=-=-=-
Gotta get a DRO!
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#4
I didn't like the condition of the motor that came with the lathe (Walker Turner?), and replaced it with a new Grizzly H5373 1/2hp 1725rpm motor. It's been working perfectly well, but I didn't check the specs closely enough to notice how short the shaft was (1.89"). A motor with a longer shaft would have been better. Either way, the NEMA 56 base plate doesn't match up with the motor mounting plate very well, and that required some modification. So I recommend measuring the output shaft on your existing motor and taking a good look at your mounting plate before buying a new motor.
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#5
Thanks!
I have the pieces and parts from a salvaged treadmill. Has a metal pulley and the controller is an MC60.
I'm thinking about tackling that project when I clear out a few others and can get to it.

_Dan
-=-=-=-
Gotta get a DRO!
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